Livestream Information

During the Eighth National Home Visiting Summit, all four plenary sessions were livestreamed free of charge to the field. Take a moment to review the plenary sessions and click the button below to watch the livestream videos.

Plenary Session Videos

January 31, 2019

  • Session Detail

    The pace of change all around us today is relentless. With the need for our important work growing in spite of our individual efforts. In this plenary session, you will learn about four principles of network leadership that have the potential to expand your reach and impact. 1) Mission, not organization; 2) Node, not hub; 3) Humility, not brand; 4) Trust, not control. Moderator and network expert, Marty Kooistra, will review the four network principles and their underlying rationale. You will also hear from leaders at the national, state, and local levels who are applying these principles, including insights from the cross-model work of the National Alliance of Home Visiting Models, the central intake efforts from the state of New Jersey, and a local organizational perspective of working across multiple agencies and programs to bring needed services to families in an under-resourced community. Finally, participants will be challenged to examine ways to incorporate the four network principles into your own work.

    Speakers Include

    • Constance Gully, President and Chief Executive Officer, and Member, National Alliance of Home Visiting Models, Parents as Teachers National Center, Inc.
    • Melissa L. Kelley, Network Facilitator, National Home Visiting Network
    • Martin Koositra, Executive Director, Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County
    • Crystal Muñoz, Founder & Executive Director, Roots Family Center
    • Lenore Scott, Administrator, New Jersey Department of Children & Families
  • Session Detail

    The home visiting field has a diverse and growing portfolio of evidence-based models and effective practices. To advance to the next level of services and supports, the field needs a learning system to strengthen and broaden home visiting impacts for diverse families. This system, a national research and development platform, transcends model and brings stakeholders together in new ways to determine what specific aspects of home visiting work best, for whom and under what conditions. This is the charge of the Home Visiting Applied Research Collaborative (HARC) and its Innovation Toward Precision Home Visiting Initiative.

    In this plenary, speakers representing key stakeholders will review accomplishments of the past 18 months and invite audience members to join in the work ahead. They will explain what precision home visiting is and why it is important, and share examples of how stakeholders in programs, communities and states across the country are working together toward this goal. We will explore the initiative’s four hallmarks: true partnership in designing and testing interventions, active ingredients, explicit measurement of the theory of change and innovative research methods to accelerate learning. Presenters will introduce basic steps: identifying potential “active ingredients” of home visiting, efficiently testing short-term impacts, adapting to expand impact and scaling up what works. Presenters will also share stakeholder perspectives on the challenges and rewards of this exciting work and give examples of how each audience member can be involved to advance home visiting’s role in the early childhood system of care.

    Speakers Include

    • Anne Duggan, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    • Brenda Jones Harden, Professor, Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland College Park
    • Allision Kemner, Vice President, Research and Quality, Parents as Teachers National Center
    • Dr. Kathy Pillow-Price, Associate Project Director/Fiscal TA Specialist, HV-ImpACT

February 1, 2019

  • Session Detail

    As the field of home visiting expands, partnering with families in at-risk communities brings to light the depth of historical and structural racism and interpersonal trauma. With an equity lens, home visiting provides an opportunity to promote resiliency and maternal wellbeing with upstream promotion, prevention and social supports that can address perinatal mental health, promote resiliency and disrupt the intergenerational transmission of biopsychological adversity. Today’s plenary will bring a discussion of the science of perinatal stress, new efforts to address perinatal stress and trauma, the experience home visitors with families with histories of racism and trauma, and opportunities within a changing policy landscape.

    Speakers Include:

    • Brenda Blasingame, M.A., Executive Director, HealthConnect One
    • Gloria Castro, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist and Certified Sexual Assault Counselor, UCSF Child Trauma Research Program
    • Catherine Monk, Ph.D.,
      Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, and Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Director for Research at the Women’s Program, Columbia University Medical Center
    • David Willis M.D., Executive Director, Perigee Fund
    • Paula Zeanah, Ph.D., M.S.N., Lafayette General Medical Center/Our Lady of Lourdes Eminent Scholar Endowed Chair in Nursing, College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions and Director of Research Picard Center for Child Development and Lifelong Learning, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
  • Session Detail

    One of the challenges facing home visiting in the United States today is how to best create a service system that reaches the most people while still being able to effectively address the needs of those most at-risk. This plenary will present an overview of the health visiting system in the United Kingdom, a universal model of home visiting for all families with young children. The presenters will examine what universalism looks like as a system, including the challenges of offering these services. Particular attention will be paid to how the role of health visitors have changed over time, and what is needed to ensure high-quality service delivery. Recent research will highlight developments in proportionate universalism as a framework for health visiting, which combines universal contacts for all families with more targeted or intensive home visiting for higher-risk families. The plenary will conclude by exploring the extent to which this model can be exported and adapted to other countries, including the United States. Emphasis will be given to what is needed in order to fully meet the needs of all young children and their families.

    Speakers Include: